★ AMSTRAD CPC ★ GAMESLIST ★ ANGLER (c) COMPUTING WITH THE AMSTRAD ★

Computing with the Amstrad
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Educational game by JOHN SHEARD and KEN GOODMAN

THIS two-player educational game is designed to develop and practice, not the skills of fishing, but the ability to estimate angles up to 80 degrees.

It was developed mainly with children aged 9 to 11, but has also proved very popular with older children and adults, who often find it harder and more challenging than expected.

At the start of the program you are asked to choose the target size and a winning score. Then you move to the main screen layout with the target positioned at random each time.

Players take it in turn to estimate the angle of the target from the baseline as viewed from their corner. This means the angle will usually be different for each player.

When an estimate has been entered the angle is shown graphically in that player's corner (to reinforce the idea of angle as rotation) before a dotted line emerges and, hopefully, heads for the target.

Lines that miss are not deleted but are retained on the screen. This can, of course, lead to a messy display if more than a few tries are needed to hit the target, but they do help in remembering what angles you've already entered and are useful for gauging the next estimate.

If two pairs of children are playing against each other a lot of useful discussion, not to mention the occasional argument, can ensue.

One point is scored for each hit, and the current score is displayed at the top of the screen. The first player to reach the preset target score is the winner.

Another game of the same length and difficulty level can be started by pressing the spacebar. Pressing Enter returns the program to the set up stage.

At the end of the game, along with the final score, the players are given a joint accuracy rating - a percentage figure derived from the total number of shots each needed to hit their targets.

I don't think anyone has played this game without questioning, at some stage, my trigonometrical ability. But if you don't believe what you see on screen, take out a protractor and check it for yourself.

CWTA

ANGLER
(c) COMPUTING WITH THE AMSTRAD

Author: John Sheard
Adapted for CPC Amstrads by Ken Goodman

★ YEAR: 1987
★ LANGUAGE:
★ GENRE: INGAME MODE 1 , EDUCATIF , PETITE ENFANCE , MULTIPLAYER , BASIC
★ LiCENCE: LISTING

★ AMSTRAD CPC ★ DOWNLOAD ★

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L'Amstrad CPC est une machine 8 bits à base d'un Z80 à 4MHz. Le premier de la gamme fut le CPC 464 en 1984, équipé d'un lecteur de cassettes intégré il se plaçait en concurrent  du Commodore C64 beaucoup plus compliqué à utiliser et plus cher. Ce fut un réel succès et sorti cette même années le CPC 664 équipé d'un lecteur de disquettes trois pouces intégré. Sa vie fut de courte durée puisqu'en 1985 il fut remplacé par le CPC 6128 qui était plus compact, plus soigné et surtout qui avait 128Ko de RAM au lieu de 64Ko.